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Original Article
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Evaluation of goodness of fit of semiparametric and parametric models in analysis of factors associated with length of stay in neonatal intensive care unit
Fatemeh Kheiry, Sadegh Kargarian-Marvasti, Sima Afrashteh, Abolfazl Mohammadbeigi, Nima Daneshi, Salma Naderi, Seyed Hossein Saadat
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2020;63(9):361-367.   Published online June 10, 2020
Question: Hospitalization in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is associated with life-threatening hazards. What factors associated with neonatal length of stay (LOS) in the NICU?
Finding: Breastfeeding, phototherapy, acute renal failure (ARF), mechanical ventilation, and central venous catheter (CVC) access were identified as factors associated with NICU length of stay.
Meaning: Protective effects of breastfeeding and CVC access, whereas increase effects of phototherapy, ARF, and mechanical ventilation in LOS can be supporting evidence to establish effective interventions to reduce length of NICU stay.
Critical Care Medicine
Comparative validity of microalbuminuria versus clinical mortality scores to predict pediatric intensive care unit outcomes
Shifa Nismath, Suchetha S. Rao, B.S. Baliga, Vaman Kulkarni, Gayatri M. Rao
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2020;63(1):20-24.   Published online August 12, 2019
Question: Does microalbuminuria predict mortality in pediatric intensive care unit?
Finding: Positive correlation was found between albumin-creatinine ratio and pediatric intensive care unit stay, organ dysfunction and need of inotropes. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for albumin-creatinine ratio was comparable to mortality scores.
Meaning: Microalbuminuria is a good predictor of outcome in pediatric intensive care unit and is comparable with mortality scores.
Neonatology (Perinatology)
Clinical impact of admission hypothermia in very low birth weight infants: results from Korean Neonatal Network
Na Hyun Lee, Soo Kyung Nam, Juyoung Lee, Yong Hoon Jun
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2019;62(10):386-394.   Published online May 22, 2019
Background: Preterm infants have difficulty maintaining body temperature after birth. However, clinical guidelines advocate that neonatal body temperature should be maintained at 36.5°C–37.5°C.
Purpose: We aimed to investigate the incidence of admission hypothermia in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants and to determine the association of admission temperature with in-hospital mortality and morbidities. Methods: A cohort study using prospectively collected data involving...
Review Article
Infection
Central line-associated bloodstream infections in neonates
Hye Jung Cho, Hye-Kyung Cho
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2019;62(3):79-84.   Published online December 19, 2018
Newborn infants, including premature infants, are high-risk patients susceptible to various microorganisms. Catheter-related bloodstream infections are the most common type of nosocomial infections in this population. Regular education and training of medical staffs are most important as a preventive strategy for central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). Bundle approaches and the use of checklists during the insertion and maintenance of central...
Original Article
Parental concerns about their premature infants' health after discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit: a questionnaire survey for anticipated guidance in a neonatal follow-up clinic
Ji-Yun Cho, Juyoung Lee, Young Ah Youn, Soon Ju Kim, So Young Kim, In Kyung Sung
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2012;55(8):272-279.   Published online August 23, 2012
Purpose

The aim of this study was to develop an appropriate nursing information guideline according to corrected age, after investigating parents' concerns about the growth, development, and diseases of their premature infants after discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

Methods

The parents of premature infants (birth weight, <2,500 g; gestational age, <37 weeks) who went to a neonatal follow-up clinic after...

Review Article
Catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonatal intensive care units
Jung Hyun Lee
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2011;54(9):363-367.   Published online September 30, 2011

Central venous catheters (CVCs) are regularly used in intensive care units, and catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) remains a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections, particularly in preterm infants. Increased survival rate of extremely-low-birth-weight infants can be partly attributed to routine practice of CVC placement. The most common types of CVCs used in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) include umbilical venous catheters,...

Original Article
Outcome and risk factors of pediatric hemato-oncology patients admitted in pediatric intensive care unit
Bo Eun Kim, Eun Ju Ha, Keun Wook Bae, Seongguk Kim, Ho Joon Im, Jong Jin Seo, Seong Jong Park
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2009;52(10):1153-1160.   Published online October 15, 2009
Purpose : To evaluate the risk factors for mortality and prognostic factors in pediatric hemato-oncology patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Methods : We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of pediatric hemato-oncology patients admitted at the PICU of the Asan Medical Center between September 2005 and July 2008. Patients admitted at the PICU for perioperative or terminal...
Outbreak of Acinetobacter septicemia in a neonatal intensive care unit
Myo Jing Kim, Hye Jin Lee, Sang Hee Son, Jae Won Huh
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2006;49(5):494-499.   Published online May 15, 2006
Purpose : Acinetobacter baumannii is increasingly recognized as an important cause of nosocomial infection, especially in neonatal intensive care units. But little is known about the clinical significance and hospital epidemiology of Acinetobacter species other than A. baumannii. The objective of this study is to describe the clinical characteristics and epidemiology of septicemia due to Acinetobacter species other than A....
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