Article 56(12); Dec 2013
Review Articles
Mechanisms of immune tolerance to allergens in children
Umut C. Kucuksezer, Cevdet Ozdemir, Mübeccel Akdis, Cezmi A. Akdis
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2013;56(12):505-513.   Published online December 20, 2013

Because the prevalence of allergic diseases has significantly increased in recent years, understanding the causes and mechanisms of these disorders is of high importance, and intense investigations are ongoing. Current knowledge pinpoints immune tolerance mechanisms as indispensable for healthy immune response to allergens in daily life. It is evident that development and maintenance of allergens-pecific T cell tolerance is of...

Food protein-induced proctocolitis: Is this allergic disorder a reality or a phantom in neonates?
Jin-Bok Hwang, Jeana Hong
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2013;56(12):514-518.   Published online December 20, 2013

The etiology of small and fresh rectal bleeding in neonates who are not sick is usually unknown; the only known cause is food protein-induced proctocolitis (FPIPC). It has been recently reported that FPIPC is a rare cause of rectal bleeding in newborns, and most cases have been proved to be due to idiopathic neonatal transient colitis. A recommended strategy for...

Inflammation and hyponatremia: an underrecognized condition?
Se Jin Park, Jae Il Shin
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2013;56(12):519-522.   Published online December 20, 2013

Timely diagnosis of hyponatremia is important for preventing potential morbidity and mortality as it is often an indicator of underlying disease. The most common cause of eurvolemic hyponatremia is the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) secretion. Recent studies have demonstrated that proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL) 1β and IL-6 are involved in the development of hyponatremia, a condition...

Editorial
Does hypertension begin in adolescence?
Kyung Lim Yoon
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2013;56(12):523-525.   Published online December 20, 2013
Original Articles
The relationships of body mass index, waist-to-height ratio, and body fat percentage with blood pressure and its hemodynamic determinants in Korean adolescents: a school-based study
Na Young Kim, Young Mi Hong, Jo Won Jung, Nam Su Kim, Chung Il Noh, Young-Hwan Song
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2013;56(12):526-533.   Published online December 20, 2013
Purpose

Obesity is an important risk factor for hypertension in adolescents. We investigated the relationship of obesity-related indices (body mass index [BMI], waist-to-height ratio [WHR], and body fat percentage [%BF]) with blood pressure and the hemodynamic determinants of blood pressure in Korean adolescents.

Methods

In 2008, 565 adolescents, aged 12-16 years, were examined. The %BF of the participants was measured by bioelectrical impedance...

Early postictal electroencephalography and correlation with clinical findings in children with febrile seizures
Kyung A Jeong, Myung Hee Han, Eun Hye Lee, Sajun Chung
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2013;56(12):534-539.   Published online December 20, 2013
Purpose

Electroencephalography (EEG) is frequently ordered for patients with febrile seizures despite its unclear diagnostic value. We evaluated the prevalence of abnormal EEGs, the association between clinical findings and abnormal EEGs, and the predictive value of EEG for the recurrence of febrile seizures.

Methods

Data were collected on 230 children who were treated for febrile seizures at Kyung Hee University Medical Center from...

Case Reports
Asymptomatic moyamoya syndrome, atlantoaxial subluxation and basal ganglia calcification in a child with Down syndrome
Kyung Yeon Lee, Kun-Soo Lee, Young Cheol Weon
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2013;56(12):540-543.   Published online December 20, 2013

Down syndrome, the most common chromosomal abnormality, may be associated with various neurologic complications such as moyamoya syndrome, cervical spinal cord compression due to atlantoaxial subluxation, and basal ganglia damage, as well as epileptic seizures and stroke. Many cases of Down syndrome accompanied by isolated neurologic manifestations have been reported in children; however, Down syndrome with multiple neurologic conditions is...

Moyamoya syndrome occurred in a girl with an inactive systemic lupus erythematosus
Yun-Jin Lee, Gyu Min Yeon, Sang Ook Nam, Su Yung Kim
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2013;56(12):545-549.   Published online December 20, 2013

We report the case of a 17-year-old Korean girl with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who presented with sudden weakness of the right-sided extremities and dysarthria. Oral prednisolone was being taken to control SLE. Results of clinical and laboratory examinations did not show any evidence of antiphospholipid syndrome or thromboembolic disease nor SLE activity. Cerebral angiography showed stenosis of the left...

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