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Review Article
Infection
Central line-associated bloodstream infections in neonates
Hye Jung Cho, Hye-Kyung Cho
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2019;62(3):79-84.   Published online December 19, 2018
Newborn infants, including premature infants, are high-risk patients susceptible to various microorganisms. Catheter-related bloodstream infections are the most common type of nosocomial infections in this population. Regular education and training of medical staffs are most important as a preventive strategy for central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). Bundle approaches and the use of checklists during the insertion and maintenance of central...
Case Report
Neonatal invasive Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus infection with delayed central nervous system complications
Jung-Weon Park, So-Hee Eun, Eui-Chong Kim, Moon-Woo Seong, Yun-Kyung Kim
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2015;58(1):33-36.   Published online January 31, 2015

Group D streptococci are known to cause newborn septicemia and meningitis, but the Streptococcus bovis group strains rarely cause serious neonatal infections in Korea. Central nervous system (CNS) complications of neonatal S. bovis group infection have rarely been reported. In adults, S. bovis group strains cause bacteremia and endocarditis, and are associated with gastrointestinal malignancy. However, only a few studies...

Original Article
Blood culture contamination in hospitalized pediatric patients: a single institution experience
Hyewon Min, Cheong Soo Park, Dong Soo Kim, Ki Hwan Kim
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2014;57(4):178-185.   Published online April 30, 2014
Purpose

Blood culture is the most important tool for detecting bacteremia in children with fever. However, blood culture contamination rates range from 0.6% to 6.0% in adults; rates for young children have been considered higher than these, although data are limited, especially in Korea. This study determined the contamination rate and risk factors in pediatric patients visiting the emergency room (ER)...

Review Article
Catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonatal intensive care units
Jung Hyun Lee
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2011;54(9):363-367.   Published online September 30, 2011

Central venous catheters (CVCs) are regularly used in intensive care units, and catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) remains a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections, particularly in preterm infants. Increased survival rate of extremely-low-birth-weight infants can be partly attributed to routine practice of CVC placement. The most common types of CVCs used in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) include umbilical venous catheters,...

Case Report
Masticator space abscess in a 47-day-old infant
Eunhee Kim, Ju Hee Jeon, Yoon Hee Shim, Kyu-Seok Lee, So Young Kim, Eun Ryoung Kim
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2011;54(8):350-353.   Published online August 31, 2011

A 47-day-old male infant presented with fever, poor oral intake, irritability, and right-sided bluish buccal swelling. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the neck showed a round mass lesion of about 2.0×1.5 cm that suggested abscess formation in the right masticator space. Ultrasound-guided extraoral aspiration of the abscess at the right masseter muscle was successful. Staphylococcus aureus was identified in the culture...

Original Article
Etiological agents isolated from blood in children with hemato-oncologic diseases (2002-2005)
So-Hee Kim, Young-Ah Lee, Byung-Wook Eun, Nam-Hee Kim, Jin-A Lee, Hyoung Jin Kang, Eun-Hwa Choi, Hee Young Shin, Hoan-Jong Lee, Hyo Seop Ahn
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2007;50(1):56-64.   Published online January 15, 2007
Purpose : This study was performed to identify the etiologic agents and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of organisms responsible for bloodstream infections in pediatric cancer patients for guidance in empiric antimicrobial therapy. Methods : One hundred and ninety-seven episodes of bloodstream infections that developed in 128 pediatric cancer patients were analyzed, which were identified at the Seoul National University Children's Hospital during...
Bacteremia in pediatric cancer patients : A single center study
Sun Mi Park, Byung Kyu Choe, Chun Soo Kim, Joon Sik Kim, Heung Sik Kim, Nam-Hee Ryoo
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2006;49(8):882-888.   Published online August 15, 2006
Purpose : Bacteremia is one of the major concerns in the treatment of pediatric cancer patients. This study was to determine the etiologic agents and the pattern of antibiotic susceptibilities in a single tertiary medical center. Methods : We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of the cases of bacteremia in pediatric cancer patients from 1998 to 2005 in Keimyung University Dongsan...
Urinary tract infections in infants under six months of age
Min Joo Kang, Hye Kyung Shin, Hyung Eun Yim, Bo-Kyung Je, So Hee Eun, Byung Min Choi, Jong-Tae Park, Baik Lin Eun, Kee Hwan Yoo
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2006;49(3):278-286.   Published online March 15, 2006
Purpose : Although suprapubic bladder aspiration(SBA) is the most reliable technique for identifying bacteriuria in young infant, no report has been published about the clinical manifestations of urinary tract infection(UTI) diagnosed by aspirated urine in Korea. This study was performed to examine clinical manifestations and related factors of UTI confirmed by a positive urine culture obtained by SBA in young infants. Methods : We reviewed...
Clinical Entities and Etiology of Invasive Bacterial Infections in Apparently Healthy Children
Joon Ho Lee, Eun Kyoung Song, Jin A Lee, Nam Hee Kim, Dong Ho Kim, Ki Won Park, Eun Hwa Choi, Hoan Jong Lee
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2005;48(11):1193-1200.   Published online November 15, 2005
ilus influenzae has been declined to 4% each from 23% and 14%, respectively, compared to previous study. S. agalactiae was the most common isolate in the infants ≤3 months. Among the infants and children aged 3 months to 2 years and children of 2-5 years, S. pneumoniae(57%, 52%, respectively, in each group) was the most common isolates followed by S....
Etiology of Community-acquired Bacteremia in Healthy Children
Hyung Tae Kim, Hyun Oh Jang, Jin Soo Moon, Seung Yeon Nam, Dong Wook Kim, Chong Guk Lee, Chong Rae Cho
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2005;48(7):716-722.   Published online July 15, 2005
Purpose : A full view of the spectrum of all bacterial diseases in healthy children is essential to the establishment of public health priorities. Accurate information on the relative importance of the various pathogens in terms of the age of the affected patients, the site of infection and the case fatality rate are valuable to the clinician in choosing antimicrobial...
Bacteremia in Pediatric Cancer Patients : Causative Organisms and Antibiotic Sensitivities
Yong-Han Kim, Hyun-Dong Lee, Jeong-Ok Hah
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2005;48(6):619-623.   Published online June 15, 2005
Purpose : Bacteremia in immunocompromised pediatric cancer patients can lead to high morbidity and mortality, if not treated early and properly. The incidence and antibiotic sensitivities to common pathogens of bacteremia in pediatric cancer patients are liable to change, according to region and time. We investigated the causative organisms and antibiotic sensitivities of bacteremia in pediatric cancer patients to assess...
Urinary Tract Infections in Febrile Infants under Three Months of Age
Byung Wook Eun, Yoo Mi Chung, Hee Gyung Kang, Il Soo Ha, Hae Il Cheong, Hoan Jong Lee, Yong Choi
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2003;46(3):265-270.   Published online March 15, 2003
Purpose : To characterize the infants under 3 months of age with urinary tract infections(UTIs), and especially patients with bacteremia or meningitis Methods : Hospital records of all the infants under 3 months of age discharged from our hospital for 69 consecutive months with the diagnosis of initial episode of UTI were reviewed. UTI was defined when patients had fever with...
Usefulness of Low Risk Criteria for Serious Bacterial Infection Among Febrile Infants Younger than Three Months of Age
So Hyun Kim, Ji Ah Jung, Hae-Soon Kim, Eun Sun Yoo, Sejung Sohn, Jeong Wan Seo, Seung Joo Lee
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2002;45(8):967-972.   Published online August 15, 2002
Purpose : A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the usefulness of low risk criteria for identifying febrile infants younger than three months unlikely to have serious bacterial infection. Methods : We conducted a retrospective study of 527 infants younger than three month with a axillary temperature ≥37.4℃. If they met the following all four criteria, appear well, WBC 5,000- 20,000/mm3,...
The Risk Factor of Bacteremia in Children with Febrile Neutropenia due to Chemotherapy
Tae-Hong Kim, Young-Ho Lee
Clin Exp Pediatr. 1998;41(5):677-683.   Published online May 15, 1998
Purpose : We evaluated the easily-assessable risk factors to predict bacteremia in children with febrile neutropenia, who received anticancer chemotherapy. Methods : We retrospectively reviewed 46 children who had febrile neutropenia caused by anticancer chemotherapy between March, 1993 and February, 1997. The patients with localized infection on presentation were not eligible for this study. We evaluated the correlation between bacteremia and...
Retrospective 3-year Clinical Study of Enterobacter Bacteremia in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
Kwang Ok Chung, Chun Hyuk Chang, Sung Min Cho, Dong Seok Lee, Doo Kwun Kim, Sung Min Choi
Clin Exp Pediatr. 1998;41(4):466-471.   Published online April 15, 1998
Purpose : Enterobacter is one of the important organisms in neonatal intensive care unit. We reviewed the clinical characteristics, underlying diseases, invasive procedures during admission, mortality and antibiotic sensitivity of Enterobacter infection in NICU. Methods : We retrospectively reviewed 21 neonatal patients whose blood cultures yielded Enterobacter between June 1994 and June 1997 at Dongguk University Hospital. Results : Blood cultures were positive in 62...
Polymicrobial Bacteremia in Children
Hyun Seung Park, Myung Ik Lee, Soon Wha Kim, Don Hee Ahn
Clin Exp Pediatr. 1992;35(4):499-507.   Published online April 15, 1992
A clinical observation was made on 212 cases of bacteremia in children, who were hospitalized at department of pediatrics, National Medical Center from Jan. 1981 to Dec.1988 The results were as follows; 1) Blood culture proven bacteremia were 212 cases in children. Among them polymicrobial bacteremia were 22 cases(10.4%) and monomicrobial bacteremia were 190 cases(89.6%). The same species of bacteria was cultured...
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