Article 65(1); Jan 2022
Review Article
Neonatology (Perinatology)
Growth patterns of preterm infants in Korea
Joohee Lim, So Jin Yoon, Soon Min Lee
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2022;65(1):1-9.   Published online July 8, 2021
∙ The growth of preterm infants is a main focus of neonatology.
∙ Preterm infants in Korea, especially those with a very low birth weight, achieve retarded growth.
∙ Careful growth monitoring and early intervention will contribute to better development outcomes and quality of life for preterm infants and improve public health.
Neurology
Worldwide national intervention of developmental screening programs in infant and early childhood
Seunghyo Kim
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2022;65(1):10-20.   Published online September 30, 2021
∙ Prevalence rate of developmental disabilities has been reported from 8% to 15% and its rate is increasing worldwide.
∙ The critical period of intervention for developmental delay is before the child reaches 3 years of age.
∙ All primary care pediatricians should conduct developmental surveillance and screening tests to infants and children at scheduled visits. Through this, they are liable for providing early identification and timely intervention.
Gastroenterology
Upper gastrointestinal tract involvement of Crohn disease: clinical implications in children and adolescents
Eun Sil Kim, Mi Jin Kim
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2022;65(1):21-28.   Published online September 10, 2021
· Clinical manifestations of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) tract involvement in Crohn's disease (CD) are common but often clinically underestimated.
· Diagnosing CD by confirming inflammation of the UGI tract histologically is challenging because macroscopic and microscopic findings overlap with those of other diseases.
· Ongoing efforts are needed to enable a standardized assessment of UGI CD in the future.
Editorial
Endocrinology
Pediatric obesity: life cycle approach of pediatrician and society
Yong Hee Hong
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2022;65(1):29-30.   Published online December 28, 2021
• With the emerging epidemic of pediatric obesity, many endocrine comorbidities classically seen in adulthood are surfacing much earlier in life.
• Appropriate obesity counseling and education should be provided from infancy to adolescence.
• Managing pediatric obesity may require school and society involvement.
Pediatricians must consider familial environment when diagnosing and managing childhood obesity
Young Suk Shim
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2022;65(1):31-32.   Published online April 19, 2021
•The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing worldwide, including in the Republic of Korea, creating a major public healthissue.
•Accumulated evidence indicates a strong relationship between parentalandchildobesity.
•A family-based approach is indicated to prevent and manage childhoodandadultobesity.
General Pediatrics
Is it time to add point-of-care ultrasound education to pediatric residency curriculum?
Shin Ae Yoon
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2022;65(1):33-34.   Published online October 12, 2021
Growing point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) use in pediatric patients has led to the need for POCUS education for pediatric residents. Recent experimental studies have suggested that POCUS education improves self-rated POCUS confidence and comfort in pediatric resident training. Considering the effective and sustainable POCUS education curriculum in pediatric resident training, simulation-based education would be a solution.
Original Article
General Pediatrics
Global relationship between parent and child obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Ju Suk Lee, Mi Hyeon Jin, Hae Jeong Lee
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2022;65(1):35-46.   Published online March 29, 2021
Question: Are parent and child obesity correlated worldwide?
Finding: Overweight and obese status of parents and children were significantly associated worldwide. The association between parent and child obesity was stronger in Asia than in Europe and the Middle East, and in high-income than in middle- and low-income countries.
Meaning: Childhood obesity is highly influenced by parental weight status, indicating that parents could play an important role in its prevention.
Cardiology
Vasovagal syncope with mild versus moderate autonomic dysfunction: a 13-year single-center experience
Han Eoul Lee, Dong Won Lee
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2022;65(1):47-52.   Published online June 1, 2021
Question: It is well known that autonomic dysfunction contributes to vasovagal syncope (VVS). Does the degree of autonomic dysfunction contribute to clinical manifestations, diagnostic methods, treatment, and prognosis?
Finding: The clinical manifestations, diagnostic methods, treatment, and prognosis differ between patients with mild and moderate degrees of autonomic dysfunction.
Meaning: VVS is caused by autonomic dysfunction, but autonomic dysfunction severity need not be classified.
Letter to the Editor
Other
Evaluation of simulation-based ultrasound course for pediatricians: a starting point for future training curriculum
Chon In Kuok, Avis Siu Ha Leung, Jonan Chun Yin Lee, Winnie Kwai Yu Chan
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2022;65(1):53-55.   Published online July 28, 2021
Question: Simulation-based ultrasound training is becoming more popular. Is there a role for pediatricians in such training programs?
Finding: Our program received promising feedback from its participants. Self-rated confidence in image interpretation and ultrasound-guided catheter insertion improved after the simulation. Participants reported a higher preference for performing ultrasound scans before radiologist assessment.
Meaning: Ultrasound training can be considered as part of the pediatric training curriculum in the future.
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